Wet Forests and Rainforests

Lyn and I recently visited the Tarra-Bulga and Mitchell River National Parks. We found a rather delightful camping park called the Tarra Valley Caravan Park “Fernholme”, surrounded by tall eucalypts and tree ferns.

We walked up the road beside the Tarra River from the caravan park and came across the studio of an artist called William Holt. His website is here. His abstract paintings, some of which I found quite evocative, use very thick paint. I shot a few pictures of brushes and paint tins around his studio while looking at his work. He agreed to me making a portrait of him. In this shot of him I have him holding a paint tin – he uses too much paint to use tubes.

William Host, abstract artist.
William Host, abstract artist.

I will rework this image in black and white at a later date to see if it fits with my collection of black and white portraits of blokes. I often use a small camera, currently a Fuji X100T, for these environmental portraits because it is less intimidating and the modest wide-angle lens shows the essential background.

Den of Nargun Track, Mitchell River National Park
Den of Nargun Track, Mitchell River National Park

Walking along the tracks provided in both national parks we photographed as we went. A tripod is mandatory because most of the area is in deep shade. The camera here is a Nikon D800. We were lucky that it was overcast and avoided spotty light and that there was no wind so the tree-fern fronds were sharp.

Ancient Tree, Tarra-Bulga National Park
Ancient Tree, Tarra-Bulga National Park

Naturally you cannot move off the tracks for very sound reasons, if not to preserve the ecology, then to avoid getting lost in the dense rainforest growth. However, this does restrict you photographing areas that have been photographed many time by others.

Glimpse of the stream, Tarra-Bulga National Park
Glimpse of the stream, Tarra-Bulga National Park

New Gallery

In looking over my collection of images I actually didn’t realise that I had so many pictures of women and that many of these would translate to monochrome. You will see that I have now added another group of pictures in the People Gallery blog page called “Mostly Women”. There is no particular reason why all these portraits are black and white except that I started making them 40 years ago when it was only practical and economic for me to make monochrome prints. I have found that by removing the distraction of colour from a photograph and reworking the artistic controls, the portrait is strengthened.